The Path of Thorns and Rocks

Before I begin this week’s blog, I’d like to remind us all that today is 9/11.

May all of us remember with love and compassion this day.
May we grieve with those who still mourn,
And share memories with those who cannot forget.
May we draw strength from those who bravely responded,
And gave their lives to save others.
May we stand with strangers who became neighbors that day,
And remember their generosity and hospitality.
Above all God may we remember your faithfulness
And learn to trust in your unfailing love

https://godspacelight.com/2011/09/09/memorial-prayers-for-911/

The other morning, I heard an interview with Jeannie Gaffigan, wife of comedian, Jim Gaffigan, that echoed recent thoughts of mine. Her new book, When Life Gives You Pears: The Healing Power of Family, Faith, and Funny People (Oct 1, 2019), tells the story of what she learned after being diagnosed with a brain tumor. The main takeaway from the interview was, good can come from bad. No matter what cross we bear, we can choose how to carry it, how we respond to it, and how to navigate to the end of the painful road. More importantly, we can take that pain and suffering and put it toward the good. How fitting that we think of this today.

9-11 NYC Flag.jpg

And how clear this was to me this past weekend. Read more

There’s Gotta Be A Little Snow Sometime

SnowyTrees2019.JPGOne day last week, while my husband and youngest daughter slept snugly in their beds, and Mother Nature covered the trees and fields with a soft blanket of white, I quietly walked outside in the dark to take some photos of the gently falling snow. The world around me was cold, barren, frozen and unwelcoming. And it was absolutely exquisite. It was my favorite kind of snow. It fell softly from the sky, landing on every branch, leaf, and needle, turning each and every tree into a glowing, white piece of art, a fine sculpture created by the loving hand of God. I couldn’t help but think about a conversation that I’ve had with more than one person lately.  

You see, I’m noticing a trend, and it makes me sad. I see it in the young and old, in the workplace and in school, among volunteer committees and organizations, even within my own family. Everyone is looking for the easy way out, the no-pain method of doing things. There is a belief that everyone is entitled to happiness, to the never-ending bliss that drowns all pain and discomfort and allows each person to live a life of total pleasure without worry or sacrifice. I’ve even heard people say that here, in the United States, everyone is entitled to be happy.  

But they’re wrong. Read more