Rolling with the Punches

I’ve learned many things over the course of my lifetime, but the most important thing, the thing that comes back to me time and time again, the thing that keeps me sane when the world is swirling out of control, is that nothing you do matters more than being flexible. No matter what curve balls life throws at you, it’s vitally important that you roll with the punches.

 

We are almost halfway through Girl Scout camp week, and we’ve had our ups and downs, as is normal. Some nights, it’s all I can do to make it to my bed (and some mornings, I don’t want to open my eyes). But I know that come sunrise, I have to get up and do it all over again, a little better, a little clearer, a little differently, but again and again and again. When something fails, go wrongs, or ends in frustration, I can’t give up, give in, or walk out. When you’re the top gun, it’s your job to fix the problems, correct the mistakes, tweak the programs, and make things work the way we all think they should. The only way to keep it going is to suck it up, roll back my shoulders, and do what needs to be done.

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Sometimes, all you need is to say a prayer, take a deep breath, and find a way to relax and regroup.

 

When camp is over, I’ll be back home and back at work. According to my beta readers, my next novel needs a lot of work. That’s okay. I expected that. The first draft is always rough. I could take all that work and delete it, never looking back; or I can start at the beginning and do what needs to be done. Like any other author, writing is my job, and I have to be flexible. Sometimes, my favorite parts of the book have to be thrown out. Just because I like it, or it’s good writing, doesn’t mean it works in that book. And I’m at peace  with that. My writing can’t flow if I can’t go with the flow.

So the next time you’re faced with an obstacle in life, something that just isn’t going right, or a necessary change in plan, remember that everything is fleeting. Few things that are done can’t be undone. Say a prayer, then change your course. In most cases, whatever has gone awry can be fixed with prayer, reasoning, and perhaps a little elbow grease. So get going. Let nothing stand in your way. You can do this.

You’ll get mixed up, of course,
as you already know.
You’ll get mixed up
with many strange birds as you go.
So be sure when you step.
Step with care and great tact
and remember that Life’s
a Great Balancing Act.
Just never foget to be dexterous and deft.
And never mix up your right foot with your left.

And will you succeed?
Yes! You will, indeed!
(98 and 3/4 percent guaranteed.)

KID, YOU’LL MOVE MOUNTAINS!

So…
be your name Buxbaum or Bixby or Bray
or Mordecai Ali Van Allen O’Shea,
You’re off the Great Places!
Today is your day!
Your mountain is waiting.
So…get on your way!

From: Oh, The Places You’ll Go by Dr. Seuss

What I was writing about one year ago this week: Update on 150 Reasons to Go.

Amy Schisler is an award winning author of both children’s books and novels for readers of all ages. She lives with her husband and three daughters on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. Her books, Picture Me and Whispering Vines, are recipients of Illumination Awards, placing them among the top three inspirational fiction books of 2015 and 2016. Whispering Vines was awarded the 2017 LYRA Award for the best romance of 2016. Amy’s most recent novel, Island of Miracles, is now on sale.

You may follow Amy on Facebook at http://facebook.com/amyschislerauthor, Twitter @AmySchislerAuth, Goodreads at https://www.goodreads.com/amyschislerand at http://amyschislerauthor.com.

Amy’s books: Crabbing With Granddad (2013), A Place to Call Home (2014), Picture Me (2015), Whispering Vines (2016), Island of Miracles (2017), Stations of the Cross Meditations for Moms (2017)

Three Simple but GIGANTIC Reasons to Try Something New

This morning, I had the pleasure of having my daughter, Rebecca, and her best friend, Bailey, accompany me to my weekly cardio class. While they teased me about it not being “their thing,” they both did just fine and even seemed to enjoy themselves. Whether they ever return to class with me or not, it was great to see them trying something new. Of course, that’s not unusual for our family. We are always willing to try something new, go somewhere different, experience things outside of our comfort zones. I think this is one of the reasons our family is so highly addicted to the The Amazing Race. For years, Rebecca and I have said that we’re going to go on the show (I’m just crossing my fingers that it’s still on once she finishes law school). It’s partly about the trip around the world, partly about the race to win a million dollars, but mostly about the chance to do things that no ordinary person would ever have the chance to do. What have we got to lose? More importantly, if you try something new, look at all you could gain.

Discover something you never thought you’d enjoy – Years ago, my sister-in-law invited us to go camping with her and her family. The closest thing I’d ever done to camping was to go to a Campfire Girl lock-in when I was about twelve. Chrissy even warned us that she was sure I was going to hate every minute of it. Now here I am, fifteen years later, running a week-long overnight, outdoor Girl Scout camp for 120 young girls. And it’s the highlight of my year. Who would ever have thought that I would not only enjoy camping, but that it would become a huge, and I mean huge, part of my life?

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Discover a hidden talent – I see young girls every summer stepping out of their comfort zones when they arrive at camp. Yes, it’s hot (some years, over 100 degrees). Yes, there’s dirt. Yes, there are bugs. Yes, we swim in a lake with frogs and fish and other creatures. And the girls zip line, shoot arrows, climb a rock wall, canoe and kayak, and take part in various programs that encompass everything from photography to baking to sewing. Girls who have never picked up a needle and thread go home with a whole quilt to hang on their walls. You never know what you’re capable of until you try.

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Discover yourself – There are many people who found their true calling simply by trying something new:

Theodore Geisel, better known as Dr. Seuss – While studying for his PhD in English Literature, Geisel learned that he had a talent for drawing. Throwing caution to the wind, he quit his job and his studies and wrote a little book called, And to Think I Saw it on Mulberry Street. Rejected 28 times, the book eventually became one of the most beloved children’s books of all time.

George Lucas – A passionate race car driver, Lucas gave up his ambitions after a crash that nearly cost him his life. With no idea what to do with his life, he enrolled at the University of Southern California and pursued a career in film. Over forty years later, the force is certainly with him.

Henry Ford – At the age of twenty-eight, Ford decided to try something new with his life and took a shot at becoming an engineer. Seven years later, he designed the first automobile, an utter failure. But through hard work and perseverance, over ten years after taking a chance on a new career, Ford had his first success and has become a household name and an industry standard.

J.K. Rowling – Having graduated with a BA in French and Classics, Rowling was married and had a child when she began writing the Harry Potter series on a whim after the idea literally “popped into her mind.” Today, Rowling is the first person to ever become a billionaire through writing.

https://www.wanderlustworker.com/48-famous-failures-who-will-inspire-you-to-achieve/

I could go on and on, but I think you get the point. Unless you try something, you will never know where it might lead you in your life. You might never discover who you are truly meant to be.

Never be afraid to try. Never say no to a new experience, a new job, a new endeavor. Take that leap. Give it a try. You never know where it may lead.

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What I was writing about one year ago this week: Finding the Way.

Things I’ve read this week that are worth sharing:  10 Road Trips You Can Take Over a Weekend;  Did You Have A ‘Blankie’ As A Kid? Here’s What That Says About Adult You; and Men saying “no thanks” to college.

Amy Schisler is an award winning author of both children’s books and novels for readers of all ages.  She lives with her husband and three daughters on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. Her books, Picture Me  and Whispering Vines, are recipients of Illumination Awards, placing them among the top three inspirational fiction books of 2015 and 2016. Whispering Vines was awarded the 2017 LYRA Award for the best romance of 2016. Amy’s most recent novel, Island of Miracles, is now on sale.

You may follow Amy on Facebook at http://facebook.com/amyschislerauthor, Twitter @AmySchislerAuth, Goodreads at https://www.goodreads.com/amyschisler and at http://amyschislerauthor.com.

Amy’s books: Crabbing With Granddad (2013), A Place to Call Home (2014), Picture Me(2015), Whispering Vines (2016), Island of Miracles (2017), Stations of the Cross Meditations for Moms (2017)

Oh, The Places You’ll Go (to borrow from Dr. Seuss)

Dear Katie,

1999 scrapbook15Where did the years go? It seems like just yesterday, I was being rushed into the operating room, Dr. Joe assuring me that everything was going to be okay. You’ve always had a way of doing things like that to us: changing the plot just when we thought we were all on the same page. You were due on March 3, 1999, but apparently, you weren’t ready yet. On March 2nd, Dr. Joe told me that you would not be making an appearance for at least another week. Of course, you do always try to be punctual, so whether my body was ready or not, you were determined to come on March 3rd. And you did.

 

July 4thIt didn’t take long to realize that you had a strong will and an aggressive, but at the same time, sweet personality. You always seemed to be at odds with yourself: shy but gregarious; strong-willed but obedient; inquisitive and skeptical but trusting; outwardly radiant and happy but inwardly scared and insecure. As Winston Churchill said, you have always been “a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma.”

 

We watched you go from a smiling, confident toddler to a timid, hesitant little girl. And I began to worry. Tests showed that you are a genius, a child far beyond her years in intelligence but one who suffers from a severe lack of attention and focus. We were told you were an Einstein who would never succeed in school. Over the years, you curled into yourself like the potato bugs that amazed me as a child. We helplessly watched, praying for the right words, the right path on which to find you. What we couldn’t know, didn’t see, was that you were forging your own way. The student who was predicted to never understand math and be a poor reader has mastered Calculus and rarely looks up from a book. The girl who has a hard time opening her mouth in a crowd is a lector at Mass and a key player in school productions. The child we worried would always be a follower is president of one of the largest clubs in school and edior-in-chief of the yearbook.

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DSC03407.JPGYour father and I thought we would spend your life watching out for you, steering you in the right direction, worrying about your every decision. But you’ve taught us to have faith, in God and in you. While we saw dark clouds and ominous skies, you, to quote Louisa May Alcott, were “not afraid of storms, for [you were] learning how to sail [your] ship.” While we saw a path that led into a dark and scary forest, you saw “two roads diverged in a wood,” and you chose the one that “made all the difference” (Robert Frost). As we held our breath and waited for the floor to drop out from under you, you held fast to your dreams, closed your eyes, and took a leap, many leaps, challenging yourself to take the harder class, go for a lead in the play, run for the highest office, and venture into places others dared not go. And you did it all with grace and joy.

Over the past two weeks, we have seen you accept one award after another, smile as the accolades piled before you, and shine for the world to see. On Thursday night, as you march across the stage, know that you can keep marching. No matter what obstacles you face, you will overcome them. No matter how rocky the road is ahead, you will persevere and succeed. Remember that Daddy and I are always here for you. We love you. We know that today and every day is your day. “Your mountain is waiting. So…get on your way!”

Love, Mom

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What I was writing about one year ago this week: A Season for Changes.

Things I’ve read this week that are worth sharing:  According to Harvard Psychologists: Parents Who Raise “Good” Kids Do These 5 Things from Curious Mind MagazineYou’re Going To Miss It on Beauty Beyond Bones; and 11 Simple Changes I Made to Improve My Writing Habit by Michelle Zunter in The Huffington Post.

Amy Schisler is an award winning author of both children’s books and novels for readers of all ages.  She lives with her husband and three daughters on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. Her books, Picture Me  and Whispering Vines, are recipients of Illumination Awards, placing them among the top three inspirational fiction books of 2015 and 2016. Whispering Vines was awarded the 2017 LYRA Award for the best romance of 2016. Amy’s most recent novel, Island of Miracles, is now on sale.

You may follow Amy on Facebook at http://facebook.com/amyschislerauthor, Twitter @AmySchislerAuth, Goodreads at https://www.goodreads.com/amyschisler and at http://amyschislerauthor.com.

Amy’s books: Crabbing With Granddad (2013), A Place to Call Home (2014), Picture Me(2015), Whispering Vines (2016), Island of Miracles (2017), Stations of the Cross Meditations for Moms (2017)